time in winter snows???

A

Member

My saturn aura xe 07 like most cars sucks in winter driving, i could do part time uber but need to fix some minor things in my car. A suv they are great in snow drive and that was always gonna be my next vehicle. Should i get an suv through lift uba and pay weekly and drive suv knowing snow wont be a problem or fix up my car and have hard time in winter snows???

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Telegram Whatsapp Pocket
April 27, 2020 5:12 AM

Winter tires are specially designed for cold temperatures and winter precipitation. Once it gets warm, you won't need deep tread depths to handle snow or biting edges for traction on ice.

Faster wear on warm, dry pavement - the tread rubber of winter tires is considerably more flexible than that of all season and summer tires. That same pliable tread rubber that adds traction in winter will wear down quickly in warm temperatures. Summer and all-season tires are built to withstand warm temperatures, providing long wear life.


Decreased performance - In warm weather, winter tires won't provide the same handling capabilities as summer or all-season tires. Imagine if you needed to make a quick maneuver and your tires were soft and squishy. You won't get the crisp response from a winter tire in warm weather. Winter tires need that flexibilitity to handle ice and snow, but it's not as useful in warm weather.

June 5, 2020 11:28 PM
  1. Don’t use cruise control. Winter driving requires you to be in complete control of your car at all times, and it is important since a patch of slippery ice can pop up on the road at any time. For this reason, using cruise control in wintry conditions makes roads that much more dangerous.
  2. Watch out for black ice. Thin, transparent ice that blends in with the color of the pavement, commonly known as black ice, is especially dangerous because it’s hard to spot, and you don’t know you’ve come up on it until you’ve slid over it. The best way to handle black ice is to let up on both the gas and brakes, and keep the wheel straight. If you start to fishtail (when the back of your car starts to spin), gently turn the wheel to the direction the spin is going until you’ve stopped or have regained traction.


June 11, 2020 2:12 PM

If you intend on driving year round and plan to be a driver for several more years, I would invest in a better vehicle. SUVs tend to be gas hogs, so keep that in mind. You could probably get a mid-range one and lease it which will keep your protected from maintenance.

July 25, 2020 6:25 PM

Considering the gas prices are going to go back up real soon, I would advice against getting an SUV. You can look into tire options for the car you have now and see if winter tires would make it better to drive in.

July 25, 2020 6:41 PM

Winter tires are always good practice when it's snowing.


If that doesn't help you enough, maybe try putting chains on your tires as well. They really help the car grip to the road.

July 27, 2020 12:19 AM